July 27, 2013 Sunday Whirl #119

Enso

Calligraphy by Kanjuro Shibata XXNote:The pattern of the artist’s process is a circle.

Enso

One day

Always the first day

Always a beginning

Gather scarce resources

Jeweled colors

 Stuffed into tubes

The finest brush

Paper like skin

Revisit old ideas

Rooted in days gone bye

Weigh their strength

Count crows on the fence

Woven into patterns

Catching rain

To water the vegetation

That fills the garden

 And grows in your brain

 Left unattended

 The cells of the

 Heart are eroded

 Without the strength

 To begin again

Until the last day

 When the artist

 Breaks the circle and

 Stops

This infomation from wikipedia.   This is about the Japanese word, Enso, which means circle.
Ensō (円相) is a Japanese word meaning “circle” and a concept strongly associated with Zen. Ensō is one of the most common subjects of Japanese calligraphy even though it is a symbol and not a character. It symbolizes absolute enlightenment, strength, elegance, the universe, and the void; it can also symbolize the Japanese aesthetic itself. As an “expression of the moment” it is often considered a form of minimalist expressionist art.

In Zen Buddhist painting, ensō symbolizes a moment when the mind is free to simply let the body/spirit create. The brushed ink of the circle is usually done on silk or rice paper in one movement (Bankei, however, occasionally used two strokes) and there is no possibility of modification: it shows the expressive movement of the spirit at that time. Zen Buddhists “believe that the character of the artist is fully exposed in how she or he draws an ensō. Only a person who is mentally and spiritually complete can draw a true ensō. Some artists will practice drawing an ensō daily, as a kind of spiritual practice.”[1]

Style[edit]

Some artists paint ensō with an opening in the circle, while others complete the circle. For the former, the opening may express various ideas, for example that the ensō is not separate, but is part of something greater, or that imperfection is an essential and inherent aspect of existence (see also the idea of broken symmetry). The principle of controlling the balance of composition through asymmetry and irregularity is an important aspect of the Japanese aesthetic: Fukinsei (不均斉), the denial of perfection.
The ensō is also a sacred symbol in the Zen school of Buddhism, and is often used by Zen masters as a form of signature in their religious artwork. For more on the philosophy behind this see Hitsuzendo, the Way of the Brush or Zen Calligraphy.

Prompt: one,  wove, scarce, revisited, rain, rooted,

crows, vegetation, last, cells, eroded, strength

May 5, 2013 We Write Poems

prompt 154 who is your protagonist?
MAY 1, 2013
tags: protagonist, We Write Poems
by Irene
Write about an ordinary day where nothing much happened except the usual. Tell us what’s the usual. You could go that way or you could decide to make some surreal thing happen.
You’re the poet. You can write whatever.
(And if you survived Napowrimo, all the more you should adopt the “I can do whatever” attitude.)
To make it interesting, you’d have to give a sense of the protagonist in your piece. Whether you use the first or third person you have to have a protagonist. Give the person a name. If you’re following this prompt site, then you will have to bear in mind that you’re going to write a series of poems featuring that protagonist.
So this is the first.
You can link your poem to this post once it’s written. You have all week to write. Next Thursday, we’ll see you for a new prompt. Hint hint: It’ll have to feature the protagonist. The idea is that the protagonist will somehow tie all your poems together so there’s a kind of storyline going on. We’ll explore. We’ll make the ordinary extraordinary.

Cinco de Mayo
The 5th of May
Certainly not an ordinary day
And yet for Frida
It is just the same
Up early
Still dark

To the studio
Turn on computer
Post poem
To the Sunday Wordle
Have a little read
To see what others have done

As the sun shows its’ head
Not back to bed
But an ordinary
Breakfast instead
An egg, toast
Fresh orange juice
A cup of hot coffee
Extraordinary

All is quiet still
Back to the studio
Organize the last work
Put it away
Clean the work area

Will start new work today
It is dust in the desert
That will get you
Can’t leave anything
For a day
Before it is coated
And grey

So celebrate
The 5th of May
Light your candle
And prey
The work when finished
On an ordinary day
Will be judged
Extraordinary
…. Some will say

February 12, 2013 dVerse

Lonely Man

This is a song

The Villagers would sing

About a lonely man

In his hometown

They whispered

His name

He fought his demons

On the darkest nights

Even fought them

In the broad daylight

Never won a round

Take a break

The bell would ring

They would go at it again

In his hometown

They Whispered

His name

Snortin’

Kickin’

Growling and such

A worthy opponent

He lived another

Day to fight again

But as the song goes

Each time the drink

Would win

Having said all this…

I am grateful

To have known him

Glad he came

On lonely days

Listen carefully

On the wind

Hear the sadness

As I whisper

His name…

Neil

Note: My friend, Neil, was a lonely man.